The Future of Crowdsourcing: From Idea Contests to MASSive Ideation

füller2Johann Füller

 

 

 

 

 

 

hautz2

Julia Hautz

 

 

 

 

 

 

hutter2

Katja Hutter

 

 

 

 

 

 

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No matter who you are, most of the smartest people work for someone else. —Bill Joy, Sun Microsystems cofounder

Groups of people with highly diverse skills and professional backgrounds can often outperform an internal R&D department of a company in coming up with innovations (Tuomi 2003). Hence organizations are looking for ways to collaborate with employees from different departments and organizational backgrounds, as well as with customers, suppliers, and other partners outside the organization’s boundaries. They are increasingly aware that they need to tap into both internal and external knowledge sources to accelerate innovation (Darroch 2005; Leonard-Barton 1995). To connect several thousand innovative people scattered all over the planet, a number of methods and tools such as virtual customer integration (Dahan and Hauser 2002), netnography (Kozinets 1999), and tool kits (Piller and Walcher 2006; Thomke and von Hippel 2002) have been introduced. These tools mainly aim at actively integrating inventive users into the innovation process. Among the most popular and promising forms of open innovation are innovation competitions (Terwiesch and Xu 2008), ideagoras (Tapscott and Williams 2006), and problem-broadcasting platforms like InnoCentive (Lakhani and Jeppesen 2007).

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The Book

The book Leading Open Innovation describes OI’s search for smart people who might expand the space for innovation.
It reflects international, cross-sector, and transdisciplinary interests among contributors from the United States, Germany, France, Finland, the United Kingdom, Portugal, Tunisia, Austria, and China working in large multinational organizations, academic institutions, or entrepreneurial projects.
They are part of the Peter Pribilla network, which Ralf Reichwald describes at the end of the volume as a point of contact that supports overlapping interests in innovation and leadership.

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