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Innovation & Leadership

PETER PRIBILLA-STIFTUNG

Projects

Selected projects, realised with support from Peter Pribilla Foundation.

Innotracing – Capturing the Messiness of Innovation (2012)
Failure-Driven Innovation (2012)
Critics vs. Creators Leading Innovation? (2012)
Visualizing User Innovation in Health Care (2011)
Solve Different (2011 )
Epidemic Communicator (2011)
From Real to Virtual (2010)
Real Open Innovation (2010)
Resolving Dilemmas in Collective Innovation (2010)
Open Government 200 (2010)
Open Architecture (2010)
Turning Co-Creators into Brand Ambassadors (2009)
Open Innovation Readiness (2009)
Visualizing the Intangible (2009)
Massive Ideation (2009)
Encounter for Innovations (2009)
Open School (2009)

Innotracing – Capturing the Messiness of Innovation (2012)

Prof. Dr. Ian Sutherland / Dr. Birgit Penzenstadler / Dr. Hans Lundberg / Dr. Paul Blažek / Dr. Hagen Habicht

The phenomena of leadership, creativity and innovation in the moment are complex, non-linear, recursive, unpredictable and largely tacit. Yet in the end successful efforts converge to form meaningful and valuable new ideas, products, services, business models and more. These processes often arouse astonishment in the eyes of participants and spectators alike and we are left with the question, how does does it happen that a group of people working together come up with something so unique, new and novel?

Despite decades of study, theorization and modeling, the moment to-moment unfolding of these processes, the micro-heart of leadership, creativity and innovation, remains an unexplored black box. The “moments of significance” (MOS) – those turning and tipping points crucial to outcomes where leadership and innovation bloom or fade – remain to researchers and practitioners, invisible despite our sensing of their presence.

The InnoTrace team has set our task at developing a software tool and social science methodology to open this black box and to make the invisible moments of significance (MOS) visible. Our aim is to capture, trace & analyze the moment-to-moment messy, tacit intangible and intangible elemtns of leadership, creativity and innovation. Within the current state of the art, researchers cannot analyze such processes in order to track these moments because we are lacking a systematic approach and data gathering tool to do so. At the same time, practitioners can also not recapture these moments, neither for reconsideration of an earlier dismissed idea nor for reflecting upon and improving leadership and innovation processes.


Failure-Driven Innovation (2012)

Dr. Olivier Berthod / Dr. Allen Alexander / Dr. Sebastian Kunert / Dr. Torsten-Oliver Salge / Dr. Anne L. Washington

When it comes to research and teaching on innovation, case selection suffers from a success bias. Academia loves to tell stories of breakthrough innovations to practitioners and focuses, in the classroom, on successful organizations and best-performers. This project thus unpacks the zone of obscurity that has emerged around the notions of failure and innovation. We address the following questions: Why do we rely so much on success-stories? Do we foster misconceptions about the nature of innovation? Can we augment our knowledge from success stories through failure stories? And how can we make this knowledge visible and accessible for all?

Focusing on failures with large-scale consequences (either for the organization as such or for the broader society, i.e. negative and/or undesirable outcomes in form of an unexpected and substantial gap between performance aspirations and actual performance), the objective of this project is to research, unpack and disseminate a set of in depth-case studies that would:

1) make failure experiences visible for innovation management teaching

2) make visible the mechanisms that link failure experiences to innovation (of others)

3) make visible the facilitating role of leadership in this process

Failures, understood here as critical events with large-scale consequences (as defined above) has been partly overlooked by researchers to date, despite its relevance. However, it is widely recognized that organizations learn primarily from problems and that failures motivate leaders to challenge institutionalized assumptions. We therefore believe failure experiences to be an important trigger for innovation. That said, we suggest that the process that leads from failure to innovation, has remained by and large invisible to researchers as well as to the classroom.


Find more information about the project: Failure-Driven Innovation on the projects' website.

Critics vs. Creators Leading Innovation? (2012)

Jun.-Prof. Dr. Julia Müller / Dr. Celine Abecassis-Moedas

- Do rotten tomatoes (or stars) matter to chefs? The aim of this project is to make the role of critics visible in both, the innovation process of firms where leader-creators drive innovation and the process of leading innovation in the industry. Figure 1 illustrates the aim of the project. The dashed line indicates that previous research has not taken the role of critics in the innovation process into consideration. Only the role that critics play on the market by influencing customers and consequently sales, has been researched. As the aim of the project is to identify the role that critics play in the innovation process, we have to deal with critics in detail. Therefore, we differentiate between expert critics and non-expert critics. Expert critics are professional reviewers who have a certain level of expertise. They normally adopted a standardized reviewing process in order to evaluate the quality of a service or a product. In contrast, non-experts is everybody else who evaluates the same service or product and publishes it (e.g. in online communities).


Visualizing User Innovation in Health Care (2011)

Dr. Denita Cepiku / Dr. Katja Hutter / Dr. Sara Poggesi / Prof. Dr. Pedro Oliveira

The literature on user innovation in health-care services has identified examples of service development (including medical treatments) by users. For example, in October 1969, Richard Bernstein, a type 1 diabetes patient, came across an advertisement of the first blood glucose meter that would give a reading in 1 minute, using a single drop of blood. The device was intended for emergency staff at hospitals to distinguish unconscious diabetics from unconscious drunks. The instrument weighed three pounds, cost $650, and was only available to certified physicians, and hospitals. Determined to take control of his situation, Bernstein asked his wife, a doctor, to order the instrument for him. Bernstein began to measure his blood sugar about 5 times each day, and soon realized that the levels fluctuated wildly throughout the day. To even out his blood sugars, he adjusted his insulin regimen from one injection per day to two, and experimented with his diet, notably by reducing his consumption of carbohydrates. Three years after Bernstein began monitoring his own blood sugar levels, his complications were still progressing, and he began researching scientific articles about the disease. Bernstein, a “user”, is believed to be the first individual to self-monitor his blood sugar, and was an early advocate for such monitoring by diabetics (Bernstein 2007). Bernstein is just one of many users who developed important solutions for their own disease (Oliveira, von Hippel, and DeMonaco 2011).

 

This is just one of the many examples in which a treatment or medical device was developed by patients. We call these examples the “celebrity user innovators”. We aim at identifying actual user innovators, and plan to share those innovations with patients that can benefit from them.

 

Therefore the following questions should be answered:

-        How can we identify the user innovators in health care, and the innovations they developed?

-        How can we make them “visible” to society?

-        How does society benefit from users innovations in Healthcare services?


Watch the presentation about this project on Slideshare
Find more information about the project: Visualizing User Innovation in Health Care on the projects' website.

Solve Different (2011 )

Prof. Oliver Fritz / Dr. Bernhard Rothbucher / Sven Richter

Today, one of the main demands of executive leadership is flexibility in thinking. But such flexibility not only concerns quick and confident choices amongst a range of alternatives, it also means to question the underlying frame of reference for decision-making – to open up new points of view. Today’s leaders have to be able to find ways to “think outside of box”. But as it might be relatively easy to revise a decision, it is less easy to give up a mind-set approved in use.

 

The tools and methods we effectively use for sense-making out of data every day also create gravity towards a restricted range of solutions. We forget about the underlying assumptions, and get unaware of the blind spots all individuals necessarily have. The use of a tool comes along with a myopia or even blindness against new information, innovative ideas or opportunities for rethinking. In consequence, companies, and their leaders get stuck in patterns of thinking that grow less, and less applicable in changing circumstances. Often, it is only a situation of crisis that forces leaders to rethink their assumptions, and points of view.

 

Therefore, it is the objective of the project “Solve Different” to make visible a way in which leaders can consciously unleash themselves from the fixation to certain patterns of thinking caused by the usage of their tools, and approaches. For a series of tools for visualising data, and decision-making, we will investigate the aspects that occur when we make aware the assumptions, and frameworks that rule their application. By means of our results, we would like to enable leaders to think outside the box to solve their decision problems differently.


Watch the presentation about this project on Slideshare

Epidemic Communicator (2011)

Dr. Gordon Müller-Seitz / Dr. Carsten Reuter / Dr. Christoph Stöckmann / Dr. Wotan Wilden

The objective of this Peter Pribilla Fellowship project is to elucidate how service innovations in the face of uncertainty, with regard to food borne disease outbreaks, emerge. This context is deemed adequate due to its high societal, and managerial relevance, as recent serious human infections in the course of enter haemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) have highlighted an unexpected vulnerability in the German health care sector this year.

 

What is more, we aim at getting a more thorough understanding of how actors, in particular organizations, actually face uncertainty. Thus, we make service innovations and managerial practice efforts visible, ensuing from dealing with uncertainty resulting from large scale disease outbreaks. Uncertainty – understood here as the unexpected and non-calculable – by contrast to calculable risks has been only rarely researched to date despite its societal relevance, and omnipresence. Thus, it is not surprising that recently there have been increasing calls to devote more attention to this theme. For instance, the recent global financial crisis has revealed the shortcomings of sophisticated mathematical models. In a similar vein, notions of risk fail short to offer answers to related incidents imbued with uncertainty like the terrorist attacks of 9/11, tsunamis or the volcanic ash clouds of the Icelandic volcano.

 

The way that (inter)organizational actors actually deal with uncertainty before, during and after such phenomena, has been researched within disciplinary silos, mostly in an isolated manner, and sticking to risk conceptions.


Watch the presentation about this project on Slideshare

From Real to Virtual (2010)

Dr. Alexander Richter / Dr. Anna Trifilova / Prof. Dr. Jan H. Schumann

The aim of the project ‘From Real to Virtual’ supports the translation of insights from face-to-face meetings, such as a workshops, into a virtual format so that insights can be shared, developed, and acted upon by a wider community, be it inside organizations or among customers across dispersed geographical locations.

 

The ambition of this project is to enable exploration and continuation of face-to-face encounters by transferring essential insights into virtual realms where it can be picked up by (a) a larger number of participants, and (b) across a wider spatial/geographical dispersion. The solution developed by the project team will support this so far untackled issue. By doing so, this project will enable the shift from rather synchronous idea generation processes – mostly taking place in the face-to-face contexts – to rather asynchronous innovation processes – mostly taking place in virtual settings. A crucial factor to be taken into consideration in the transfer from ‘real’ to ‘virtual’ is the influence of different cultures, be it at the organisational, industry or national level.

 

Thus, in our project we will try to enhance our understanding of the influence of culture (a) when moving from ideation to enactment or implementation (b) transferring ideas, and insights from the real to the virtual world, and (c) sharing insights, and ideas generated in a small community with a larger audience, which is often unknown in its diversity.


Watch the presentation about this project on Slideshare

Real Open Innovation (2010)

Dr. Holger Hoffmann / Dr. Angelika Bullinger-Hoffmann / Prof. Dr. Andrei Villarroel / Prof. Dr. Dominik Walcher

In recent years, literature on innovation has begun to explore new models of innovation in which commercially valuable knowledge is easily exchanged among different actors of the innovation process. Following the logic of open innovation, it seems reasonable to make the strongly protected IP marketable, as it constitutes the means to earn rents for the company. Nonetheless, companies are currently facing difficulties managing the dilemma of strongly, and weakly protected intellectual property. Particularly, designing an open innovation processes that fits best company needs remains an unsolved challenge for most practitioners. There is a growing need to manage disclosure, access, and process, to best leverage the IP held by companies, and to create the greatest value from open innovation. Our project’s objective is to make patents more transparent, following the motto of the Peter Pribilla-Foundation: We aim to make the invisible in patents visible. The ROI project addresses the difficulty to access patents by the research strand patent which comprises three open innovation practices combined to visualize the currently invisible knowledge:

  • Open collective work, i.e. patent translation via Amazon’s mechanical turk by the crowd
  • Open evaluation, i.e. evaluation of comprehensibility of translations by the crowd
  • Matching game, i.e. comparison, and ranking of translations by the crowd
  • Open collective work, i.e. visualization of translations by the crowd
  • Open evaluation, i.e. comparison of text, and visualizations by the crowd

The ROI project addresses the difficulty of decision‐making by the research strand practices, which comprises three steps to realize a prototypical toolkit for selection of open innovation practices:

  • Identification of open innovation practices, and according data collections
  • Identification of contextual factors influencing innovation practices
  • Design, and development of a prototypical toolkit

Watch the presentation about this project on Slideshare

Resolving Dilemmas in Collective Innovation (2010)

Prof. Dr. Pascal Le Masson / Dr. Tobias Fredberg / Prof. Dr. Blanche Segrestin / Dr. Martin Wiener

Research indicates that organizations that successfully apply collective innovation methods are able to reconcile seemingly contradicting management situations. Further it is shown that people in liminal conditions, e.g. periods of transitions or on the borderlines between organizations, experience a state of flux where contradictions arise: assigned roles, and goals are difficult to understand for those individuals.

 

The management of such liminal conditions can either acknowledge these paradoxes or manage them. Clegg, da Cunha, and Cunha (Clegg, da Cunha, & e Cunha, 2002) review the literature on managerial paradoxes, and find that ““the two opposite poles of a paradox may be present simultaneously, beyond the will or power of management. Little can be done other than to acknowledge their presence”“ (p. 484). Managers must find their places on the continuum between the two extremes. The authors argue that paradoxes are part of the everyday practice of management, and that there is value of having such paradoxes. In this context, Beech, and colleagues (Beech, Burns, de Caestecker, MacIntosh, & MacLean, 2004) argue that the most reasonable way to handle managerial paradoxes is to simply act to transform constructively, rather than remove the paradox. From this recent collective innovation research (Elmquist, Fredberg, Ollila, & Yström, 2010, forthcoming), we know that dilemmas are present in the management of collective innovation, as could be expected due to the liminal character of associated innovation activities. However, the context of collective innovation raises new issues: How do “opinion leaders” like “firm leaders”, as well as lead users or community leaders who work together to simultaneously solve dilemmas? How do participants appropriate, and / or share results, and values? What are the forms of “centralization” at the ““collective” level (inter-firm, ecosystem, etc.)? In collective innovation research, the following issues remain unclear:

 

  1. How are leaders/organizations solving dilemmas? In particular we wonder how do they collectively shape the not‐yet visible or in other words the emerging future?
  2. What are the “hidden/invisible” variables (with regard to leadership, processes, IT tools etc.) enabling them to resolve resulting dilemmas? What are relevant conditions, and efficient means for creating promises, and shaping the not‐yet visible or the emergent?

Watch the presentation about this project on Slideshare

Open Government 200 (2010)

Dr. Michael Steinbusch / Prof. Dr. Dennis Hilgers

Theories of innovation suggest that the process of product and service development is becoming more open, placing more emphasis on external knowledge, and involving a wide range of external actors to achieve, and sustain innovation.

 

The growing success of open innovation practices in many firms raises the question of whether these principles can be transferred to innovate public sector organizations. Going beyond a technocratic e-government paradigm, but with the support of internet technology, we present a structural overview of how external collaboration and innovation between citizens, and public administrations can offer new ways of citizen integration and participation, enhanced performance, and benefits for the political decision-making process.

 

The project Open Government 200 provides a vast overview about the advantages, chances, and implementations of Open Government – focusing on Germany, but including international comparisons. The question proposed is, if, and how public administrations already open up toward different stakeholders within the decision-making processes, and whether they are actively searching for collaboration with external partners (Open Government). Central for the project is the use of internet-based platforms, and existing research in the area of urban planning, and architecture. Key questions are: Which methods exist, that allow citizens to participate in infrastructure projects, and civil engineering? Which experiences were made with those methods so far? What are experiences made? How much is the planning of public construction oriented by the needs of users, and residents? Are there any positive experiences with the design, and planning of construction in collaboration with citizens? In what sense does this new forms differentiate in terms of procedural forms of citizen participation?


Watch the presentation about this project on Slideshare
Find more information about the project: Open Government 200 on the projects' website.

Open Architecture (2010)

Dr. Michael Steinbusch / Prof. Dr. Dominik Walcher

Since the beginning of the cultural evolution of mankind, architecture has been forming social interactions, and serves as a collective memory, as well as builds an institutional framework for human life.

 

For the most part, architectural production in history was anonymous, in the sense that only architects were involved in the development process and deeply rooted in cultural practices. Nowadays, architecture is mainly a globalized profession in which cultural aspects only play a minor role. We have become a society of innovations, and inventions, the latest development being the opening of innovation strategies, and their transformation into network structures that extend beyond a company’s systemic borders. Taking into account the deep impact architecture has on human societies, the following question arises: Why don’t we develop architecture applying open strategies? This question has a special thrill because architecture itself has grown into an open strategy: Open innovation is not only a transgression of company borders but also of (organizational, professional) borders within a company as well.

 

As the latter are the products of organizational practices they cannot be overcome (for the sake of innovative power) by organizational means by itself, but have to be transcended in a realm of perception, and embodiment without giving up strategy. Architecture embodies those non-organizational perceptions, and embodiments that are based on form, function light, and material. Open architecture strategies are a special way of self-organization helping communities to develop their own visible structures of social perception.


Watch the presentation about this project on Slideshare

Turning Co-Creators into Brand Ambassadors (2009)

Catharina van Delden / Dr. Bernhard Doll / Prof. Dr. Nancy Wünderlich

The project “from co-creator to brand ambassador” had the overall goal of developing a new, internet-based method for co-creating products with consumers that not only helps to create more successful new products but also to involve the co-creators as brand ambassadors and “evangelists” when launching the new product to the market. This method shall provide benefit for all parties involved: The participating consumers as well as the companies, who open their innovation processes. The co-creators shall have their voice and wishes heard and especially feel appreciated for their contribution as well as have a lot of fun when helping in product development – keyword “gamification”. The companies on the other side, who ask co-creators for help, shall have the security that the result will provide value to their organizations. In particular, that means that the solutions found with this method shall fit to their company strategy as well as brand positioning. For this purpose a prototype internet platform was to be created; targeted at the consumer goods industry as a starting point.

 

The underlying observation behind this project was an overwhelming enthusiasm and interest by co-creators in earlier projects, which utilized the Pico-Job method. We asked ourselves: “How can we tap into this potential and help companies to identify and work with brand ambassadors amongst co-creators?”.

 

The concrete goal of “visualizing the invisible”, which was sponsored by the Peter Pribilla foundation, aimed at communicating the complex methods and its benefits to the co-creators. This is why an explanation video was created, together with a guiding icon-set. Further on it was important to support co-creators in the visualization of their own ideas and suggestions. This is why we sent out the first set of user innovation toolkits containing spices and more ingredients in order to support the co-creation of new flavours of mustard.

 

By now, the platform named “unserAller” is an established co-creation and crowdsourcing site with 20.000 registered members and several products brought to the market. Large consumer good brands like Görtz, dm Drogeriemarkt, Ford or Manhatten have co-created products on unserAller as well as hundreds very small organizations like crime novel authors, cover song bands or anti-aging product producers have kept the platform alive with their dialogue about new offerings. Publications like the Handelsblatt, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Deutschlandradio, t3n or Glamour have written very positive reviews about the platform and the products created on it. innosabi (with the product unserAller) has been recognized by federal minister Dr. Rösler as the most innovative startup of 2011.


Watch the presentation about this project on Slideshare

Open Innovation Readiness (2009)

Dr. Christoph Ihl / Prof. Dr. Vera Blazevic

Open Innovation equally attracts the interest of academics, and practitioners. Meanwhile, the paradigm is well accepted in research, and practice, still several questions remain unsolved, for instance concerning possible designs of open innovation strategies, and requirements, a firm has to meet, to actually profit from opening up innovation processes.

 

In this stage it is important for responsible managers to understand that Open Innovation is not a “One-Size-Fits-All”-concept. Rather the decision about the optimal degree of openness must be made based on internal conditions of the organization, and the business environment. Therefore, the central aim of this project was to develop a benchmarking tool helps innovation managers to evaluate open innovation strategies on suitability, and design for their own businesses. This tool was based on a comprehensive screening of relevant data sources.  Another central challenge was to translate academic findings into a comprehensible and attractive benchmarking tool for management purposes. To secure a high diffusion of the tool it was accessible via a public website. Managers are able to outline the profile of their business with the help of identified criteria. On the one hand these criteria describe the degree of openness, and on the other hand the structure of the organization, and competences. In the end managers get a comprehensive visualization of their degrees of openness, and organizational structure to derive managerial need for action.

 

Specifically, the position of their own business in contrast to more successful, and less successful businesses are shown. Additionally, also the way those businesses act towards Open Innovation is displayed. With the help of this tool deficits in the implementation of open innovation strategies can be pointed out effortless, and immediate. It was shown that managers that used the tool gained advantages from the public accessibility.


Watch the presentation about this project on Slideshare

Visualizing the Intangible (2009)

Dr. Bernhard Doll / Bettina von Stamm / Prof. Dr. Michael Koch / René Frieß

The project “Visualizing the intangible” primarily aimed at developing methods and tools for employees, and teams within organizations to facilitate conversion of ‘the abstract’ in daily work to tangible, and clear statements, and concepts. ‘The abstract’ stands for new strategies, processes, services, business models, forms of organizations, etc., which are difficult to put into words. Therefore it is not easy to communicate them by traditional means. Main aim of this approach was to identify new, and interesting fields of research for innovation research, and to develop tools that can be used later.  Another objective is to promote developed tools throughout the Peter Pribilla Network. Furthermore empirical data was generated during the development, and usage of tools. This data was analyzed afterwards. For accomplishing the objectives of the project, 3 main activities were conducted:

 

  • Development of a construction kit that helps to build physical images of innovative strategies, business models, and services. The construction kit can be used by employees of different branches without any excessive training. The price is similar to professional moderation kits.
  • Use of the construction kit in several workshops, and events to demonstrate benefits of physical images in innovation processes, and to introduce the construction kit. The focus was put on workshops within the network of the Peter Pribilla-Foundation to ensure distribution of results. Throughout this process empirical data was generated.
  • Development, and maintenance of a blog that lists derived solutions for the development of physical images, and best practices that help to connect interfaces between electronic, and physical images. Some approaches were already existent in the Peter Pribilla network, like Cue Cards, Table top, Community-Mirror, Surface-Table, Social Prototyping, LEGO Serious Play.

Watch the presentation about this project on Slideshare

Massive Ideation (2009)

Dr. Florian Forster / Dr. Hagen Habicht / Prof. Dr. Johann Füller / René Frieß

Both creativity workshops, and online innovation platforms, such as –community platforms, have certain advantages, and disadvantages. While the number of participants for workshops is limited, online platforms often require increased efforts to facilitate, and steer activities.

 

By means of conscious moderation, and application of creativity techniques in workshops, ideas, and concepts are systematically and effectively developed. Meanwhile the lack of guidance on innovation platforms direct to a rather unstructured, and informal approach in which participants run the risk of getting lost. The aim of the project “Massive ideation“ is to combine advantages of both forms of collaboration.  Hence, a new software-based concept is developed which allows realizing creative online workshops with “massive“ participation. This software, so called “Massive ideation”, aims to solve the organizational and communicative challenges cursed by massive attendance (> 100 participants). To bring valuable ideas and concepts to light a structured presentation and moderation is developed. Through a simple, and intuitive design of the platform the activities, communication, and interaction processes between participants is directed, and supported Combining “Wisdom-of-the-crowd”, and workshop principles guaranteed the boost of creativity without losing focus, and strategic impact. The platform steers massive participation by breaking down innovation tasks into easily manageable steps assigned to individual participants. In a further step, partial results are integrated in the design of the platform in iterative cycles and finally transferred into final concepts. So far, accurate knowledge about the use of creativity techniques, and guided creative processes for massive participation is still lacking.

 

The implementation of online workshops with a sizeable group of participants for the first time aims to fill this gap. Hence, new knowledge for specific users and experts in massive online contexts is generated. Technically, the workshop platform Idea Stream, and the community platform HYVE IdeaNet, form the basis for the newly created “massive ideation” platform. Existing functionalities of both systems are integrated, and adapted to fit the requirements of massive online ideation.


Watch the presentation about this project on Slideshare

Encounter for Innovations (2009)

Prof. Dr. Nancy Wünderlich / Prof. Dr. Vera Blazevic

With support of the Peter Pribilla-Foundation a pilot study about service encounter was conducted. The study aimed at generating new knowledge concerning critical interactions of service-providers, and service-consumers. To achieve this aim, the project participants brought in gained knowledge from previous studies, they have conducted.

 

Those studies found that not only a service output is achieved, and achieved on provider-, and costumer-side, but valuable knowledge is generated through a well-designed interaction – the encounter of services – between customers and providers. Aforesaid is supported by the study “Managing innovation through customer coproduced knowledge in electronic services: An exploratory study” (published in JAMS, 2008). The study shows that the employee’s point of view, i.e. customers of electronic services, play three different roles, and within these roles diverse knowledge stocks are created during service encounter. Furthermore, a second study within the field of call centers reveals that employees need different abilities (e.g. investigative and adoption abilities) to generate several kinds of knowledge in interaction with the customer. Still several gaps and challenges concerning the generation of knowledge during service encounter remain unsolved. Especially dyadic data is missing that takes both perspectives, i.e., customers, and provider’s perspective, into account.

 

So the focus of this project was to find answers to the question how knowledge that was generated during service encounter can be used to create innovations, and to improve employee management. Results are expected to show how the service encounter should be ideally designed for generating knowledge. Furthermore, the study asks how generation of knowledge impacts perceived service quality, and also to what extent the knowledge can be used as a pool of ideas for leadership, and innovation management.


Watch the presentation about this project on Slideshare

Open School (2009)

Dr. Christoph Ihl / Prof. Dr. Johann Füller / Dr. Michael Bartl / Dr. Nizar Abdelkafi

The aim of the Open School project is to strengthen the openness of universities to its students. In an Open School, students do not take a passive role as service consumers; they are active, and empowered members of their university. Hence, the open school reflects a new mindset in higher education enabled by the usage of latest crowdsourcing technologies.

 

The web-based IDEANET platform is an adequate system to support universities in launching an Open School project. Three case studies conducted at German higher education institutions demonstrate the feasibility of the concept in practice. The case studies show that students are willing to contribute with their ideas to different issues, ranging from new entrepreneurial business models, improvements of study conditions or creation of new teaching, and research methods. Including grading systems and possibilities for students to realize their ideas in practice are promising, and effective reward mechanisms to steer student participation. In some circumstances, however, the use of grades as a reward can give rise to conflicts among students, and hence needs to be carefully designed.


Watch the presentation about this project on Slideshare